Workplace Sexual Harassment FAQs

Below are answers to some commonly asked questions about sexual harassment in the workplace. If you don’t see the information you are looking for, contact us and we would be happy to assist you.

FAQS

If you have been or are being sexually harassed in the workplace and are looking for support visit What Can I Do If I Am Being Sexually Harassed?

If you have been or are being sexually harassed and would like more information on filing a human rights complaint you can inquire at the Yukon Human Rights Commission.

Spot is an AI chatbot and can be used to document any incidents of harassment or discrimination, including sexual harassment in the workplace. Visit this link to start using Spot.

Find more information on workplace sexual harassment policy development on our resources page or at https://www.chrc-ccdp.gc.ca/eng/content/anti-harassment-policies-workplace-employers-guide/.

Policies can be a very useful way to help prevent and address workplace sexual harassment. Establishing and enforcing anti-harassment policies in the workplace can be an efficient way for employers to demonstrate to their employees that workplace sexual harassment will not be tolerated.

Policies can also be very helpful in addressing workplace sexual harassment. If a complaint of sexual harassment is made, a comprehensive policy will establish the procedures that must be followed which can ensure that employers and employees understand their duties and can follow them.

Find more information on workplace sexual harassment investigations on our resources page.

If an employee makes a complaint, employers are responsible for conducting an investigation. Investigating complaints of workplace sexual harassment is an important step to ensuring a workplace that will not tolerate sexual harassment. This will also ensure that the proper remedies and reparations are made which can improve the workplace efficiency and morale.

Everyone has a role in preventing workplace sexual harassment. Our Resources page (link) has some information about how to prevent sexual harassment in the workplace.

There is also the opportunity to develop the skills to address workplace sexual harassment at the 2021 and 2023 Yukon Human Rights Commission conferences. Visit our project page for more information on the upcoming conference.

If you are an employer in Yukon and are looking for resources on how to address and prevent workplace sexual harassment in your workplace visit our resources page or contact the Commission.

The Yukon Human Rights Commission can provide training to workplaces or groups about workplace sexual harassment and the Yukon Human Rights Act.

There may be other free resources available for workplace sexual harassment training in Yukon and online such as

Contact us to book a training session.

The Commission is available to provide training outside of Whitehorse remotely by video conference.

Presently, the Commission will not be traveling to provide training on workplace sexual harassment and the Yukon Human Rights Act due to COVID-19.

Contact us for more information or to book a training session.

An option for addressing workplace sexual harassment may be to file a human rights complaint at the Commission. To find more information about filing a complaint visit How to file a Human Rights Complaint page.

To learn how to file a human rights complaint visit How to file a Human Rights Complaint page.

You can inquire at the Yukon Human Rights Commission to learn more about the human rights complaint process.

You can file a complaint with the Commission whether you are still employed at the workplace or not.

A human rights complaint must be brought within 18 months of the alleged contravention of the Human Rights Act, or if a continuing contravention is alleged, the complaint must be filed within 18 months of the last alleged instance of the contravention. Contact us or more information.

You can only file a human rights complaint for someone else if they are under your legal care.

Yes, all inquiries are confidential.

If you file a complaint with the Commission and it is accepted, your complaint will be disclosed to the respondent (person/organisation you are filing against).

The human rights complaints process is confidential to the parties involved and is only public if it is referred to a public hearing. Find more information on the Yukon human rights complaint process page.

The Commission will never disclose information about a complaint to an outside party, except if it is necessary for the investigation. However, the Commission cannot force a Complainant or Respondent to keep a complaint confidential. Publicly discussing or sharing information about a complaint may make settlement discussions much more difficult. Most settlement agreements contain a confidentiality clause prohibiting parties from publicly discussing the contents of the settlement agreement.