Human Rights and Housing

01/18/2018

Free Legal Information for Landlords and Tenants
January 25, 2018 from 9:30am to 12:00pm
215 - 305 Main Street, Accessible entrance on 3rd
Preregistration is required, call 867-667-6226 or email info@yukonhumanrights.ca to register.


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Job Posting - Public Education Coordinator

01/04/2018

The Yukon Human Rights Commission is looking for a full-time Public Education Coordinator to be responsible for the development and delivery of the Commission’s public education programming, community partnerships, media and communications. The Public Education Coordinator will help to increase public awareness and education regarding human rights in Yukon, and will ensure the effective delivery and promotion of the Commission’s core public education and communication services.

We are looking for a dynamic, collaborative, creative, and organized professional with a strong background of experience related to inclusion, diversity, and human rights issues, to join our team here at the Commission.

Duties include:

  • leadership of public education projects;
  • design, delivery and evaluation of human rights programs and training;
  • planning and coordinating public events and workshops;
  • human rights policy advice and support;
  • grant applications and project budgets;
  • networking and outreach;
  • recruitment and collaboration with volunteers and partners;
  • coordination of public education related research;
  • media and communications; as well as
  • social media, e-newsletter and website content.

Essential qualifications:

  • excellent written and verbal communication skills
  • an approachable manner and interpersonal empathy
  • post-secondary education (or equivalent) in one or more of the following areas: law, education, social science, human rights, or related fields
  • leadership experience and ability to work both independently and collaboratively within a team environment
  • experience working with diverse communities, adaptability to different social settings, and professional experience interacting with the public
  • experience facilitating training in groups and one-on-one

Asset qualifications:

  • knowledge and experience in human rights education
  • demonstrated professional contacts and network amongst Yukon organizations, community groups, governments, and individuals
  • knowledge of Yukon historical, cultural, and social context, including experience and knowledge of Yukon First Nations and diverse communities
  • Experience designing educational curriculum and training programs
  • Knowledge, training and applied experience in progressive teaching and adult learning methodologies
  • Experience in media and communications, research and writing, social media
  • Experience planning events and working with volunteers
  • Fluency or proficiency in other languages, including French and ASL

This position requires a valid driver’s license and use of a vehicle, computer and social media literacy, and proficiency in MS Office. Some travel and work outside of regular business hours is required. Fluency in English is essential, and additional language skills are an asset. Full time, 35 hours per week. Hourly $35.00-42.00/hour, plus benefits, salary commensurate with experience. The Commission is willing to consider requests for flexible hours or job-sharing as appropriate.

* Note that due to work directly with members of the public, an offer of employment will be conditional upon a satisfactory ‘vulnerable sector’ police records check.

To apply, please submit your résumé and cover letter by Friday, February 2, 2018, by email to info@yukonhumanrights.ca attn. Jessica Lott Thompson, Director of Human Rights, Yukon Human Rights Commission.

 

For a copy of the full job description or for more information, please contact info@yukonhumanrights.ca or call 867-667-6226.

Job Posting - Human Rights Officer

01/04/2018

The Yukon Human Rights Commission is looking for a full-time Human Rights Officer to be responsible for intake, investigation, and settlement of human rights complaints under the Yukon Human Rights Act. The Human Rights Officer’s work focuses on enforcement and compliance under the Act, however the Human Rights Officer will also conduct research in the area of human rights, and support the Commission’s mandate to deliver public education about human rights.

Duties include:

  • meeting members of the public to provide information and assistance related to human rights complaints;
  • intake and investigation of human rights complaints;
  • preparing detailed investigation plans;
  • interviewing witnesses and gathering evidence;
  • writing comprehensive, professional, accurate, and impartial investigation reports;
  • research and writing on human rights law and issues;
  • mediation and settlement of complaints;
  • public education support, such as research, writing, public outreach and events;
  • keeping up to date on investigation techniques, dispute resolution skills, as well as legal and general research skills;
  • maintain professional file management and contact network;
  • prepare regular summaries of complaint intake and investigation;
  • other tasks as assigned by the Director of Human Rights.

We are looking for a fair and impartial, inquisitive, considerate, collaborative, and organized professional with a strong background of experience related to inclusion, diversity, and human rights issues, to join our team here at the Commission.

Essential qualifications:

  • Excellent written and verbal communication skills.
  • An approachable manner and interpersonal empathy.
  • Post-secondary education in law, human rights, investigation, writing, communications, social work, legal or social science research, or other related field. Equivalent work experience will be evaluated for consideration as appropriate.
  • Ability to work independently as well as cooperatively with staff, Commission Members, volunteers, and other organizations.
  • Experience working with diverse and/or vulnerable individuals and communities, adaptable to different social settings.
  • Experience conducting interviews and interacting directly with the public,  both in groups and one-on-one.
  • Demonstrated commitment to inclusion, diversity and human rights.
  • Demonstrated commitment to continuing professional development.
  • Computer literate and willing to learn new software.
  • Proficiency in MS Office (Outlook, PowerPoint, Word, Excel).
  • Attention to detail, strong work ethic, and willingness to work outside of customary business hours as required.
  • Willingness to travel for work or training on occasion.
  • Experience working in a team environment.
  • Fluency in English is essential, additional language skills (including French) are an asset.

Asset qualifications:

  • Advanced skills knowledge and experience in legal or social science research and writing.
  • Advanced skills, knowledge and experience in investigation and interview techniques and administrative complaint processes.
  • Skills, knowledge and experience in dispute resolution, such as mediation, negotiation, and restorative justice.
  • Experience developing investigation plans and drafting complex reports.
  • Knowledge and experience in human rights.
  • Skills, knowledge and experience in public education.
  • Background and knowledge of Yukon’s historical, cultural, and social context, including experience and knowledge of Yukon First Nations and diverse communities.
  • Knowledge, training and applied experience in inclusive best practices for client service, such as interacting with high-conflict clients and trauma-informed communication.
  • Demonstrated relevant professional contacts and network amongst Yukon organizations, community groups, governments, and individuals.
  • Fluency or proficiency in other languages, including ASL (American Sign Language).

This position requires computer literacy and proficiency in MS Office. Some travel and work outside of regular business hours may be required. Fluency in English is essential, and additional language skills are an asset. Full time, 35 hours per week. Hourly $35.00-42.00/hour, salary commensurate with experience. The Commission is willing to consider requests for flexible hours or job-sharing as appropriate.

* Note that due to work directly with members of the public, an offer of employment will be conditional upon a satisfactory ‘vulnerable sector’ police records check.

To apply, please submit your résumé and cover letter by Friday, February 2, 2018, by email to info@yukonhumanrights.ca attn. Jessica Lott Thompson, Director of Human Rights, Yukon Human Rights Commission.

For a copy of the full job description or for more information, please contact info@yukonhumanrights.ca or call 867-667-6226.

Job Posting - Legal Counsel

01/04/2018

The Yukon Human Rights Commission is seeking Legal Counsel who is bright, dynamic, inquisitive and collaborative with a strong background of experience related to inclusion, diversity, and human rights issues.

Essential qualifications:

  • Eligibility for admission to the Law Society of Yukon.
  • Post-secondary education in law.
  • Excellent written and verbal communication skills.
  • An approachable manner and interpersonal empathy.
  • Leadership skills and demonstrated professionalism.
  • Ability to work independently as well as cooperatively in a team setting.
  • Experience working with diverse and/or vulnerable individuals and communities, adaptable to different social settings.
  • Demonstrated commitment to inclusion, diversity and human rights.
  • Fluency in English is essential, additional language skills (including French) are an asset.

Asset qualifications:

  • Litigation experience or demonstrated equivalent skills and knowledge.
  • Knowledge and experience in Canadian human rights law, administrative law, Indigenous law, and other relevant areas of legal practice.
  • Advanced legal research and writing skills, including policy research.
  • Experience and skills related to: mediation and ADR, public education, and investigations.
  • Background and knowledge of Yukon’s historical, cultural, and social context, including experience and knowledge of Yukon First Nations and diverse communities.
  • Knowledge, training and applied experience in inclusive best practices for client service, such as providing service to high-conflict clients and trauma-informed communication.

This position requires computer literacy and proficiency in MS Office. Some travel and work outside of regular business hours may be required. Fluency in English is essential, and additional language skills are an asset.

Salary range is $104,000 to $135,000 per annum plus benefits, commensurate with experience. Full-time, 35 hours per week. The Commission is willing to consider requests for flexible hours or job-sharing as appropriate.

* Note that due to work directly with members of the public, an offer of employment will be conditional upon a satisfactory ‘vulnerable sector’ police records check.

To apply, please submit your résumé and cover letter by Friday, February 2, 2018, by email to info@yukonhumanrights.ca attn. Jessica Lott Thompson, Director of Human Rights, Yukon Human Rights Commission.

For a copy of the full job description or for more information, please contact info@yukonhumanrights.ca or call 867-667-6226.

2017

Supreme Court to hear Canadian Human rights Commission's arguments in historic human rights case

11/28/2017

November 27, 2017 – Ottawa, Ontario – Canadian Human Rights Commission

Tomorrow, the Canadian Human Rights Commission (the Commission) will appear before the Supreme Court of Canada to argue on behalf of the people of Canada—that they be allowed to use the human rights system to fight discrimination when it results from a federal law.

“This is a historic case with far-reaching implications for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples,” said Chief Commissioner, Marie-Claude Landry. “How the Supreme Court rules in this case will impact access to justice for Canada’s most vulnerable people, for generations to come.”

This case, based on two groups of human rights complaints known together as Matson and Andrews, seeks to address the sexism and racism embedded in the Indian Act, and how this specifically impacts the attribution of “full Status” for Indigenous persons who descend from people who were stripped of their Status in the past.

This case also challenges the argument that the Canadian Human Rights Act should not apply broadly to a federal law. Arguments presented by the Commission and the Interveners could lead to a significant ruling for people seeking to be registered under the Indian Act, but also other people living in vulnerable circumstances across Canada seeking greater and affordable access to justice:

  • grieving families of fallen soldiers who rely on the death benefit provisions of the New Veterans Charter;
  • persons seeking access to benefits under the Employment Insurance Act, including sickness, maternity, parental or compassionate care benefits;
  • military veterans, both young and old, who rely on disability awards, income support or other benefits under the New Veterans Charter, to support themselves and their families;
  • and anyone else in Canada who relies on a federal benefit program to keep food on their table, or a roof over their children’s heads.
“The Commission will argue that when Parliament passed the Canadian Human Rights Act, it wanted to create access to justice that is, at the same time, easy, simple and less expensive,” added Marie-Claude Landry. “The Act gives Canadians, especially those living in extremely vulnerable situations, the ability to access a human rights justice system, regardless of their circumstances. It is a law for all, and should be accessible by all.”

The Canadian Human Rights Commission will not be alone in making its arguments tomorrow. It has the support of several human rights organizations and individuals that will be intervening in the case. For the full list, see our accompanying Backgrounder.

The date of the Supreme Court’s expected ruling is not yet known.

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Quick Facts

Quotes

“This is an historic case with far-reaching implications for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples.”
—Marie-Claude Landry, Ad. E., Chief Commissioner of the Canadian Human Rights Commission

“How the Supreme Court rules in this case will impact access to justice for Canada’s most vulnerable people, for generations to come.”
—Marie-Claude Landry, Ad. E., Chief Commissioner of the Canadian Human Rights Commission

“When Parliament passed the Canadian Human Rights Act, it wanted to create access to justice that is, at the same time, easy, simple, fast and less expensive. The Act gives Canadians, especially those living in extremely vulnerable situations, the ability to access a human rights justice system, regardless of their circumstances. It is a law for all, and should be accessible by all.”
—Marie-Claude Landry, Ad. E., Chief Commissioner of the Canadian Human Rights Commission

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Media Contacts

Media Relations
613-943-9118
communications@chrc-ccdp.gc.ca

NEWS RELEASE

Supreme Court to hear Canadian Human rights Commission's arguments in historic human rights case

COMMUNIQUÉ DE PRESSE

La Cour suprême entendra les représentations de la Commission canadienne des droits de la personne dans une affaire historique

CASHRA Conference

11/27/2017

June 26-27, 2018

The Yukon Human Rights Commission and the Canadian Association of Statutory Human Rights Agencies will be hosting a national Human Rights Conference in Whitehorse, Yukon.

For more information or to submit ideas for speakers and panels please click here.

New OHRC Report Reinforces Concerns About Racial Profiling

05/04/2017

Read more

Government of Nova Scotia Passes Bill 59 to Amend the Accessibility Act

05/04/2017

Bill 59 to amend the Accessibility Act was passed by the Government of Nova Scotia on April 27, 2017. Nova Scotia is only the third province in Canada to pass accessibility legislation. The government widely consulted with persons with disabilities on the amendments, and the updates have received broad support from the disability community in Nova Scotia. The Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission will monitor implementation of the Act as it moves forward.

Please find the news release here: https://novascotia.ca/news/release/?id=20170427007

CBC: Heavily criticized Accessibility Act garners praise following redraft: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/accessibility-legislation-new-law-disabled-government-1.4083100

For more information and the text of the Accessibility Act: https://novascotia.ca/coms/accessibility/

Printable 'Know Your Rights' Brochures

04/27/2017

Access a Know Your Rights Brochure from our Resources page, or contact the YHRC for pre-printed copies for your organization, business, or event!

Multilingual Parenting Resources from Canadian Association of Family Resource Programs (FRP)

04/05/2017

The Canadian Association of Family Resource Programs website features resources, information and links for immigrant families and those who work with them.You can find multilingual Parenting information, in Arabic, Chinese, hindi, urdu, etc… http://www.welcomehere.ca/index.cfm?fuseaction=page.viewpage&pageid=1099

And here you can find downloadable parenting resources: http://www.parentsmatter.ca/index.cfm?fuseaction=page.viewpage&pageid=600&stopRedirect=1

YHRC Response to Proposed Amendments to Yukon Human Rights Act & the Vital Statistics Act

03/24/2017

The Yukon Human Rights Commission adds its voice to the conversation about proposed amendments to the YHRA and Vital Statistics Act to include protections for gender identity and expression. Read it in full: YHRC Response to Changing YHRA, Vital Statistics Act

Canadian Human Rights Commission "It's time to fix the Child Welfare system on reserve"

03/22/2017

Marie-Claude Landry, Chief Commissioner of the Canadian Human Rights Commission made this statement.

Inquiry Report on Sexual and Gender-Based Dress Codes in Ontario Restaurants

03/14/2017

To coincide with International Women’s Day, the OHRC has released a new report that outlines commitments made by many of Ontario’s largest and most well-known restaurant chains to eliminate discriminatory dress codes for restaurant staff. Not on the Menu: Inquiry report on sexual and gender-based dress codes in Ontario’s restaurants outlines findings from an inquiry into dress codes at certain restaurants operating across Ontario. Read more.

Legislative Amendments Will Protect the Rights of Transgender Yukoners

03/14/2017

Yukoners are invited to provide feedback and comments on proposed amendments to ​the Vital Statistics Act and the Yukon ​Human Rights Act. Read more!

Left Out: Challenges faced by persons with disabilities in Canada's Schools

03/09/2017

The Canadian Human Rights Commission issued the following new release.

Négligés : difficultés vécues par les personnes handicapées dans les établissements d’enseignement du Canada

Aujourd'hui, la Commission canadienne des droits de la personne, a diffusé le communique suivant

Dr. Ian Mosby Lecture on Hunger, Experimentation & the Legacy of Residential Schools

03/06/2017

Old Fire Hall -March 12, 2017, 3:00 PM.

The Yukon Human Rights Commission is pleased to partner with Yukon College in presenting celebrated food historian and author, Dr. Ian Mosby, of the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto. Dr. Mosby’s research revealed disturbing details about government sanctioned experimentation on Indigenous children following the Second World War.

See more about Dr. Mosby: http://www.ianmosby.ca/about/

CASHRA Conference 2017- Registration Open

03/01/2017

The 2017 Conference website is up and registration is open at: http://realizingrights2017.com/

CASHRA's website has also been updated with the link to the conference site (http://cashra.ca/conferences.html).


***


Le site Web de la conférence est lancé et vous pouvez vous inscrire en suivant le lien: http://realizingrights2017.com/fr/

Le site Web de l'ACCCDP a été mis à jour avec le lien du site de la conférence (http://cashra.ca/fr/conferences.html).

Available for Canadian Employers: Updated Federal Policy on Substance Dependence

03/01/2017

The Canadian Human Rights Commission today released "Impaired at work: a guide to accommodating substance dependence."

The purpose of the guide is to help Canadians employers understand, first and foremost, that substance dependence is a form of disability protected by the Canadian Human Rights Act. This means that when an employee is dependent on drugs or alcohol, an employer has an obligation to accommodate and support their recovery.

“Substance dependence is a mental illness that affects some 21% of Canadians over the course of their lifetime. The stigma many face often prevent employees with substance dependence from coming forward and seeking help,” said Chief Commissioner, Marie-Claude Landry. “We want employers to approach substance dependence with the same understanding and compassion that would be extended to an employee with any other illness.”

The Commission’s guide takes employers and managers through the step-by-step process of what to do if they believe an employee is impaired at work — from how to start the conversation, to when to consider accommodation, to how to ensure that job performance and workplace safety are not suffering.

The guide also explains that in order for accommodation to work, the employee must be willing to participate in the process or take responsibility for their recovery. It encourages employers to approach each employee’s situation on an individual basis, and to build accommodation, proactively, into the way they do business.

The Commission’s new Guide is now available on the Canadian Human Rights Commission’s website.

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Quick Facts

  • Since 2009, nearly 10% of mental health complaints received by the Canadian Human Rights Commission have been related to substance dependence. (Source: CHRC)
  • In 2012, approximately 21.6% of Canadians met the criteria for a substance use disorder [2] during their lifetime (Source: StatsCan)

Quotes

“Substance dependence is a mental illness that affects some 21% of Canadians over the course of their lifetime. The stigma many face often prevent employees with substance dependence from coming forward and seeking help.”

—Marie-Claude Landry, Ad. E., Chief Commissioner of the Canadian Human Rights Commission


“We want employers to approach substance dependence with the same understanding and compassion that would be extended to an employee with any other illness.”

—Marie-Claude Landry, Ad. E., Chief Commissioner of the Canadian Human Rights Commission


***


La Commission canadienne des droits de la personne a publié aujourd’hui le document intitulé Facultés affaiblies au travail: un guide sur les mesures d’adaptation pour la dépendance aux substance.

Le guide vise à aider les employeurs canadiens à comprendre, dans un premier temps, que la dépendance aux substances est une forme de déficience aux termes de la _Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne. Cela signifie que, si un employé a une dépendance à l’alcool ou aux drogues, son employeur est obligé de prendre des mesures d’adaptation et de l’aider à se rétablir.

« La dépendance aux substances est une maladie mentale qui touche environ 21 % de la population canadienne à un moment ou à un autre de leur vie. La peur d’être stigmatisés empêche bien souvent les employés qui ont une dépendance à des substances à parler de leur problème et à demander de l’aide », précise Marie-Claude Landry, présidente de la Commission. « Nous voulons vraiment que les employeurs abordent la question de la dépendance aux substances de la même manière qu’ils le feraient pour un employé qui a n’importe quelle autre maladie, c’est-à-dire avec compréhension et compassion. »

Le guide de la Commission explique aux employeurs et aux gestionnaires les étapes à suivre s’ils pensent qu’un employé a les facultés affaiblies au travail — en partant de l’étape du premier entretien qu’il faut avoir avec l’employé, jusqu’à celle où il faut envisager des mesures d’adaptation, en passant par celle où il faut veiller à ce que le rendement au travail et la sécurité en milieu de travail ne soient pas compromis.

Le guide explique aussi que pour obtenir de bons résultats avec les mesures d’adaptation qui sont prises, l’employé doit vouloir collaborer au processus ou assumer la responsabilité de sa guérison.

Les employeurs sont encouragés à évaluer au cas par cas la situation de chaque employé et à veiller à ce que les mesures d’adaptation fassent partie intégrante de leurs façons de faire.

Le nouveau guide de la Commission est maintenant en ligne sur le site Web de la Commission canadienne des droits de la personne.

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Faits en bref

  • Depuis 2009, parmi les plaintes concernant une maladie mentale que la Commission canadienne des droits de la personne a reçues, près de 10 % étaient liées à une dépendance à des substances. (Source : CCDP)
  • En 2012, environ 21,6 % de la population canadienne satisfaisaient aux critères associés à une dépendance à des substances à un moment ou à un autre au cours de leur vie. (Source : Statistique Canada)

Citations

« La dépendance aux substances est une maladie mentale qui touche environ 21 % de la population canadienne à un moment ou à un autre de leur vie. La peur d’être stigmatisés empêche bien souvent les employés qui ont une dépendance à des substances à parler de leur problème et à demander de l’aide. »

—Marie-Claude Landry, Ad. E., présidente de la Commission canadienne des droits de la personne


« Nous voulons vraiment que les employeurs abordent la question de la dépendance aux substances de la même manière qu’ils le feraient pour un employé qui a n’importe quelle autre maladie, c’est-à-dire avec compréhension et compassion. »

—Marie-Claude Landry, Ad. E., présidente de la Commission canadienne des droits de la personne

Beyond Labels: 2017 Human Rights Symposium in Ottawa

02/17/2017

Canada is seen by the world as a land of compassion for the most vulnerable. Our country, a model of diversity and inclusion, is the result of a vision, conceived some 40 years ago. In our country, differences are a source of strength, not of weakness. At the core of this vision are laws that promote and protect our diversity – the colour of our skin, our personal beliefs, or whom we love.

As part of the year-long celebrations marking the 150th anniversary of Canada, the 35th anniversary of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the 40th anniversary of the Canadian Human Rights Act, the Canadian Human Rights Commission will be hosting the foremost event on the future of human rights and equality in Canada:

Beyond Labels: 2017 Human Rights Symposium
September 27-28, 2017
Shaw Centre, 55 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario

Why this is important?

The 2017 Symposium is an opportunity to connect with people from across the country to talk openly about human rights and to share best practices. The symposium will feature prominent speakers, engaging panel and plenary discussions, and interactive workshops that will bring to light emerging and evolving issues. Check out the Website for the most up-to-date information.

Who should attend Beyond Labels - 2017 Human Rights Symposium?

Human rights advocates, academics, employers, lawyers, governmental and non-governmental organizations and engaged citizens from across the country will want to be part of the conversation. We also welcome bright and eager youth to this important event for we know that they are a gateway to real and lasting change in human rights.

Register!

By registering early, you will benefit from our early bird rate. Register here.

Questions?

Contact us by email.

Your 2017 Symposium Planning Committee


***


Le Canada est perçu à travers le monde comme une terre de compassion à l'égard des plus vulnérables. Cette vision, conçue il y a quarante ans, a fait naître un pays qui est un exemple de diversité et d'inclusion dans le monde; un pays qui reconnaît les différences comme étant une force et non une faiblesse. Au cœur de cette vision sont des lois qui favorisent et protègent nos différences - la couleur de notre peau, nos croyances personnelles, ou qui nous aimons.

Dans le cadre des célébrations du 150e anniversaire du Canada, du 35e anniversaire de la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés et du 40e anniversaire de la Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne, la Commission canadienne des droits de la personne accueillera l'événement déterminant sur l'avenir des droits de la personne et de l'égalité au Canada:

« Au-delà des étiquettes - Symposium sur les droits de la personne 2017 »
Les 27 et 28 septembre 2017
Centre Shaw, 55, promenade du Colonel-By, Ottawa (Ontario)

Pourquoi s'y intéresser?

Le Symposium de 2017 sera une occasion de tisser des liens avec des gens des quatre coins du pays grâce à des discussions libres et ouvertes sur les droits de la personne et le partage des pratiques exemplaires. Le symposium présentera d'éminents conférenciers, de captivants débats d'experts, des discussions stimulantes en plénière et des ateliers interactifs qui mettront en lumière des questions sur les droits de la personne en émergence ou en évolution. Voir le site Web pour les informations les plus récentes.

Qui devrait participer?

Ce grand événement attirera des défenseurs des droits de la personne, des universitaires, des employeurs, des avocats, des organisations gouvernementales et non gouvernementales, ainsi que des citoyens engagés de toutes les régions du pays. Nous y invitons aussi des jeunes inspirés et enthousiastes car nous leur reconnaissons la capacité d'ouvrir la porte au changement véritable et durable dans le domaine des droits de la personne.

Inscrivez-vous!

En vous inscrivant tôt, vous aurez droit à une réduction des frais d'inscription. Inscrivez-vous!

Questions?

Envoyez-nous un courriel.

Your 2017 Symposium Planning Committee

New Brunswick Human Rights Commission Launches 50th Anniversary Programming

02/17/2017

The New Brunswick Human Rights Commission's initiatives to highlight this milestone will have a strong emphasis on education and awareness.

The Commission has worked to collect numerous documents and interviews while also partnering with local institutions, including 65 libraries in the province. Learn more about 50 year of human rights in the province:

English: http://www2.gnb.ca/content/gnb/en/departments/nbhrc/promos/50th-Anniversary.html

French: http://www2.gnb.ca/content/gnb/fr/ministeres/cdpnb/promo/50e-anniversaire.html

Black History Month and Slam Poetry

02/02/2017

As part of celebrating February Black History Month, Hidden Histories Society Yukon presents Jillian Christmas with slam poetry - with one commissioned to the Yukon itself.

Come to Antoinettes from 5:30 to 7p.m., Feb. 2.

This event is free.

For additional information, please see Hidden Histories Society Yukon's Facebook event: https://goo.gl/6cHBr9

Trans Activist settles human rights case with Canadian Human Rights Commission

01/27/2017

January 25, 2017 - Ottawa (Ontario) - Gender Free ID Coalition and the Canadian Human Rights Commission

Count Us In - Just Don't Label Us!

In a landmark settlement of a human rights complaint launched in 2011 by Christin Milloy ("she/her"), a trans activist from Toronto, Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) recognizes that personally-identifiable sex and/or gender data can only be collected if there are legitimate purposes.

As a result of Milloy's complaint to the Canadian Human Rights Commission, ESDC ceased requesting documentation to change sex/gender designations in the Social Insurance Number register. ESDC, as part of a government-wide initiative, is conducting a review of the collection of sex/gender data. As an interim measure, pending completion of the government-wide review, ESDC will amend its client-facing documents and its procedures so that:

A. Providing sex/gender information is optional;

B. There are at least three options (male/female/3rd option) for completion of any sex/gender question.

Milloy recognizes that ESDC requires anonymous demographic data including sex/gender data for planning and evaluation and other legitimate purposes.

Said Milloy, "This is a revolutionary change in how the government collects data on gender. Finally, we have gotten past the question of how government will recognize changes in gender, or how to collect gender information for people who don't identify as male or female, to the recognition that sex and gender should simply not be collected in the first place."

Milloy added, "Count us in, but don't label us! We certainly want to be included in statistics about gender. But we don't want to have to out ourselves as trans or gender variant whenever we interact with the Government or show our ID."

"What it comes down to is the ability for people to choose how they define themselves and under what circumstances. There is nothing more unique or personal than our identity and gender", said Marie-Claude Landry, Chief Commissioner of the Canadian Human Rights Commission. "The Government should treat a person's gender with the same degree of privacy and respect as other markers of identity, such as race, religion, or sexual orientation." barbara findlay, counsel for Milloy, commented, "The State used to have a need to collect gender of individual citizens - back in the day when women couldn't vote, or hold property in their own name or marry another woman. But now that most legalized discrimination on the basis of sex has been removed from Canadian laws, collecting personally-identifiable gender information is more likely to perpetuate, not cure, discrimination."

"This case will provide the principles for other governments and non-government agencies in their human rights reviews of gender collection practices," said findlay. "Uncoupling gender collection from individual records enables the collection of gender data without infringing people's human rights or privacy rights."

There are already cases challenging gender collection in birth certificates, passports, and (in Saskatchewan) all government documents and data collection practices involving gender. The complainants in those cases are all members of the Gender-Free ID Coalition.

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National Consultation on federal accessibility legislation

01/27/2017

The Canadian Hard of Hearing Association is leading a national consultation process on the Government of Canada's proposed federal accessibility legislation. This legislation promises to make Canada more accessible and inclusive of persons with disabilities.

CHHA, with the help of 18 Canadian disability organizations (http://www.chha.ca/chha/spotlight.php#partners), including ARCH, wants to hear how the proposed federal accessibility legislation can achieve improved accessibility and inclusion of Canadians with disabilities.

In particular, CHHA wants to hear from youth, veterans and seniors.Sign up to participate in a webinar! You can register by going to https://goo.gl/x4xI7o.



Veterans - February 3, 2017 at 12:00 pm EST. Invitation to follow by January 10th.

Seniors - February 9, 2017 at 12:00 pm EST. Invitation to follow by January 13th.

French webinar (general discussion) - February 22, 2017 at 12:00 pm EST.

2015 - 2016 Annual Report

01/13/2017

The Yukon Human Rights Commission is pleased to release its 2015-2016 Annual Report, reflecting the activities of the Commission from April 1, 2015 to March 31, 2016.

The report is available on our website.

The Commission is mandated to promote human rights in Yukon by advocating for equality and diversity through research and education, and providing a fair, effective and accessible enforcement system for complaints filed under the Yukon Human Rights Act.

"Human rights are a constant in the everyday lives of Yukoners. In today's changing world we are reminded that each generation is called upon to protect their human rights lest they be eroded," said Russ Knutson, Chair of the Yukon Human Rights Commission. He continues, "A healthy, robust human rights system requires both independence as well as dedicated and adequate resources in order to fulfill its obligations to Yukoners."

Russ Knutson, Chair of the Yukon Human Rights Commission went on to say, "The current split funding and reporting framework for the human rights system in Yukon is inadequate. It needs to change to improve the independence of the Commission, as recommended by an all-party committee in 2008. Currently, the Commission reports to the Legislative Assembly, but the Department of Justice controls our funding and administration - which impacts our ability to access resources and meet our core mandate."

The Yukon Human Rights Commission is independent from the Yukon Government, provides human rights training and educational resources, assists both the complainant and respondent in human rights complaints, and encourages and assists with settlement efforts. Yukon Human Rights Act

For more information, the media may contact:

Emma Hanes - Public Education Coordinator
Yukon Human Rights Commission
(867) 667 6226
director@yukonhumanrights.ca

Stay Connected:

YHRC Website: www.yukonhumanrights.ca

Annual Report 2015-2016

Financial Report 2015-2016

2016

Yukon Human Rights Commission Commentary on Transgender and LGBTQ2 Rights in Yukon

07/06/2016

On June 12, people around the world woke up to the tragic news that a lone gunman had taken the lives of 49 people and injured many more in a brutal and senseless act of violence at an Orlando nightclub.

The realization that this mass shooting targeted lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people was yet another disheartening reminder that discrimination still fuels acts of hatred and physical violence, both at home, and abroad. Just this past week, Turkish police fired rubber bullets and tear gas to prevent a "Trans Pride" event from being held to mark the beginning of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Week in Turkey.

Earlier this year, Canada's only clinic providing gender confirmation surgery to transgender people was the subject of an arson attack in Montreal. After the atrocities of World War II, it was thought that the creation of laws and institutions to affirm the basic rights of individuals would provide a shield against discrimination. But the events of June 12 remind us that no defence is perfect and that the fight against discrimination is ongoing.

Since 1987 the Yukon Human Rights Commission has worked to inform and educate Yukoners about their rights and obligations and to provide an effective way to address acts of discrimination.

When the Yukon Human Rights Act was passed in 1987 it was one of the first in Canada to include sexual orientation as a prohibited ground of discrimination.

Yukon was an early leader in recognizing the rights of gay and lesbian couples, becoming the first government to extend benefits to same sex couples through its public sector collective agreements in 1990, and changing the definition of "spouse" in the Employment Standards Act in 1992 and then in other legislation in 1998 and 1999.

We were the fourth jurisdiction in Canada to legalize same-sex marriage following a successful court challenge in 2004.

In 2014 Yukon amended its Vital Statistics Act to allow same-sex parents to be named on their children's birth certificates.

Yukon Government has also taken positive steps to recognize and protect lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning and 2-spirited (LGBTQ2) students and community members in Yukon schools through its educational policy.

While the Yukon has taken some positive steps to protect people from discrimination on the basis of their sexual orientation over the past 19 years, there is still much work to be done in ensuring equality for all members of our society.

Governments across Canada, including the federal government, have amended their human rights legislation in recent years to include protection against discrimination on the basis of gender identity and expression.

The Yukon Human Rights Commission asked the government in 2008 to add gender identity to section 7 of the Human Rights Act. That didn't happen when the act was amended in 2009.

Although the Yukon Legislative Assembly passed a motion last year agreeing to address this issue the next time the Act is reviewed, no concrete action has been taken.

The Human Rights Act is not the only Yukon legislation needing to be updated to ensure that transgender Yukoners can participate fully in the life of the community without discrimination. Currently, our Vital Statistics Act requires transgender individuals undergo gender confirmation surgery before being permitted to change their sex on their birth certificates.

Transgender people around the world experience violence, discrimination, and mental health issues at far higher rates than the general population, and these risk factors are exacerbated by laws and policies which undermine trans people's ability to affirm their identities in all areas of their lives. Despite this, there are trans people in Yukon and elsewhere taking on the burden of challenging discriminatory laws in order to ensure they can live with dignity as equal members of our society.

The horrific events of June 12 should be taken as a reminder of the importance of actively addressing prejudices that continue to be pervasive in our own communities.

We know that homophobia and transphobia, along with Islamophobia, continue to exist in our society and silence in the face of such hatred can become equivalent to complicity.

Refusing to be complicit can take many forms. On a systemic level, it might mean adopting transgender standards of healthcare or changing laws and policies which compromise the safety and well-being of transgender people by preventing them from affirming their gender identity.

Or ensuring our school curriculum includes positive discussions of how stereotypes, such as homophobia and assumptions about gender, race, sexual orientation, ethnicity, culture and abilities, can affect how a person feels about themselves, as Ontario has recently done.

On a personal level, it could mean working to make our families and workspaces safer for all people, for instance, by calling out homophobic or transphobic remarks, and by using people's chosen names and pronouns.

We could also challenge ourselves to consider the way in which assumptions we frequently make about people's gender and sexual orientation make LGBTQ2 people feel uncomfortable.

Recently, the Pride flag was raised on Parliament Hill for the first time. In the Yukon, in addition to the Pride flag, the City of Whitehorse will be flying the transgender flag outside the Public Safety Building at the top of Two Mile Hill during pride celebrations this year.

This marks the first time that the trans flag has been flown by a municipality or government in the Territory.

All Genders Yukon, an organization that supports trans and gender non-conforming individuals in Yukon, is hosting the flag raising ceremony on June 23rd at noon. There will be a moment of silence for the victims of the Orlando shooting during the ceremony.

In the spirit of supporting those who are fighting for human rights protections, and in rejecting the hatred and prejudice that fueled what is a most extreme example of violence against LGBTQ2 people, the Commission urges Yukoners to join in the flag raising and other Pride celebrations happening this weekend.

The Law Society of Yukon takes steps toward Truth and Reconciliation

07/06/2016

In recognizing the significance of the Truth and Reconciliation Committee Report and the Law Society of Yukon's commitment to education for its members (as called for in the report's Calls to Action), the Law Society of Yukon is encouraging its members to take the Yukon First Nation 101 online course offered by Yukon College.

This online course was developed in partnership between Yukon College and the Council of Yukon First Nations and is focused on the territory's aboriginal culture, history and contemporary issues. The instructors incorporate historical timelines, facts, personal stories, and activities for an engaging look at history and recent developments.

Yukon First Nations 101 is already a mandatory program for students at Yukon College; a new online version is aimed at businesses, non-governmental organizations and other interested Yukoners.

Is your workplace committed to reconciliation? Tell us how!

Restaurants and Gender-Specific Dress Codes

07/06/2016

CASHRA calls upon Restaurants Canada to do more to address gender-specific dress codes amongst their members. Read the full letter.

LGBTQ2 and Transgender Rights

06/30/2016

Read our commentary on LGBTQ2 and Transgender Rights in Yukon.

Truth and Reconciliation Yukon

05/24/2016
An article of First Nations clothing

Are you working on a Truth and Reconciliation project in Yukon? The Human Rights Commission would like to hear from you!

Call 633-7623, email education@yukonhumanrights.ca or drop by our office at 101-9010 Quartz Road, Whitehorse, Yukon.

Yukon Medical Council adopts methadone standards and guidelines.

04/15/2016

The Yukon Medical Council has adopted the Alberta Methadone Maintenance Treatment Standards & Guidelines for Dependence that guides physicians in the use of methadone to treat patients diagnosed with an Opioid Dependence Disorder (ODD).

Yukon College offers First Nations 101 Online Program

04/15/2016

The Yukon Human Rights Commission staff and members will all take the Yukon First Nations 101 Program. We applaud other organizations who have also chosen to do the same, and challenge others to take this important step toward reconciliation in Yukon!

Transgender Yukoners can now self-identify on their driver’s licence and general identification card.

04/15/2016

See the Yukon Government's press release and learn about the procedure for changing gender designation on drivers licence or general identification card.

Honouring the Strength of our Sisters

04/15/2016

"Stop trying to fix Aboriginal women and address the problem," say Indigenous women to Canada's national human rights organization.

Read the full news release and report on the CHRC website.

2015

Persons with disabilities continue to be marginalized in Canadian society: CHRC

12/08/2015

Persons with disabilities continue to be marginalized in Canadian society. Half of all the discrimination complaints filed in Canada are related to disability, according to a report by the Canadian Human Rights Commission (CHRC) released today. Read the full News Release.

International Human Rights Day

11/19/2015

The Yukon Human Rights Commission and Yukon College would like to extend a warm invitation to join us on International Human Rights Day for an evening dedicated to the advancement of reconciliation in Yukon.

To redress the legacy of residential schools and advance the process of Canadian reconciliation, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission has made 94 Calls to Action. Let's get together to listen, learn, and share the ways our community is taking action and making reconciliation a reality in Yukon.

When: THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10
Where: OLD FIREHALL, WHITEHORSE
Time: 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Please RSVP to education@yukonhumanrights.ca or register here.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Transforming Gender

10/28/2015

The CBC documentary Transforming Gender tells the stories of transgender people through a set of compelling and intimate vignettes and narratives.

"The film opens up the world of transgender people to an audience that may have little awareness of what it means, and what it is like, to be - fundamentally and in your deepest core - in conflict with the gender you were assigned at birth."

A very important film and highly recommended.

Living Together Symposium

09/16/2015
A panel discussion

The Canadian Race Relations Foundation and Whitehorse community partners gathered together to explore what it means to be Canadian in 2015. The event drew over 75 participants, and focused on questions around identity and belonging, faith and spirituality.

United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP)

09/03/2015
A boy looking at his mother

The Yukon is one of the first jurisdictions in our country to endorse Canada’s Statement of Support on the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Neither Mr, Mrs or Ms, but Mx

09/03/2015

Gender neutral title 'Mx' slowly introduced to official forms. Read more in the Daily Mail.

Life Cycle of a Complaint

08/26/2015

Check out this chart on the Yukon Human Rights Commission life cycle of a complaint.

Report from Truth and Reconciliation Commission on Youtube

07/27/2015

A group of individuals across Canada video-taped themselves reading sections of the TRC report. These unique videos have been uploaded to YouTube under the hashtag #ReadtheTRCreport.

International Human Rights Youth Summit!

07/20/2015

The 12th annual Youth for Human Rights International Human Rights Summit 2015 to be held in New York from August 27th - 29th, will follow our proud tradition of bringing youth from around the world together to make Human Rights a global reality. Apply by filling out the Youth Delegate Application Form.

Human Rights Commission pleased that Methadone program is returning to WCC

06/29/2015

Methadone is once again going to be offered at the Whitehorse Correctional Centre. Read the full article in the Yukon News.

Thank You!

06/22/2015
Duane Aucoin

Thank you to everyone who visited our photo booth on National Aboriginal Day. Contact Tracey Wallace at education@yukonhumanrights.ca or 633-7623 if you would like a copy of your photo. We hope to see you next year to celebrate National Aboriginal Day!

Left: Duane Aucoin, Teslin Tlingit First Nation

New Director at YHRC

06/15/2015

The Yukon Human Rights Commission is pleased to announce that Jessica Lott Thompson was named as Director of Human Rights at the beginning of January 2015. Thompson is responsible for carrying out the administration of the Yukon Human Rights Act, and for ensuring that complaints are dealt with under the Act.

Jessica Thompson

Thompson is an experienced northern lawyer, and a former Federal Prosecutor with the Nunavut Regional Office of the Public Prosecution Service of Canada. She has served as an adjudicator on the Nunavut Human Rights Tribunal, and has represented the Crown at the Nunavut Mental Health Review Board.

She has also worked for Maliiganik Tukisiiniakvik Legal Aid in Iqaluit, for the Nunavut Department of Justice, and has held a judicial clerkship with the U.N. International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. In 2014, Thompson served as an international election observer in Ukraine for the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, Office of Democratic Institutions and Human Rights.

Thompson has had a lifelong interest in human rights and civil liberties. She holds an LL.B. from the University of Victoria, and a Masters of Arts in Human Security and Peacebuilding from Royal Roads University. Thompson is fluent in both French and Spanish.

Acting Director at YHRC

06/15/2015

The YHRC is pleased to announce that Julie Jai will be Acting Director of YHRC from May - November 2015, while Director Jessica Lott Thompson is on leave.

Julie Jai

Julie Jai is an experienced lawyer and public sector executive who specializes in human rights and Aboriginal law. She is returning to the Yukon Human Rights Commission as the Acting Director, having served in this capacity forthree-month periods in 2013 and 2014.

Julie has held senior positions with the Government of Canada, the Government of Ontario and the Yukon Government. She is an experienced negotiator, mediator, policy advisor, director and mentor who believes in working collaboratively with others to bring about positive change. Julie's previous positions include General Counsel, Policy Director and Acting Director-General, Aboriginal Law and Strategic Policy with the Department of Justice Canada; Legal Director, and Executive Coordinator, Justice Policy with the Ontario government; and Senior Counsel, Aboriginal Law with the Yukon government. She also has experience as a member of the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal and the Yukon Mental Health Review Board. She spent six years with the Yukon government providing advice on Aboriginal law and negotiating comprehensive claims.

Julie holds an LLB from Osgoode Hall Law School and an LLM from the University of Toronto. She is an active member of the Canadian Bar Association (Ontario), where she is the past-chair of the Aboriginal Law Section and serves on the Executive of the Constitutional, Civil Liberties and Human Rights Law Section. Julie is a frequent speaker at conferences and publishes in the areas of constitutional law, human rights and Aboriginal law. She is actively engaged in her community and is a Director at St. Joseph's Health Centre in Toronto and is past President of Trakkers cross-country ski club. She is an Associate Fellow with the Caledon Institute of Social Policy. She is fluent in French.

Yukon Human Rights Poster

06/11/2015

Tell your employees, clients and community that your organization respects human rights by printing out and displaying a Yukon Human Rights Poster.

Truth and Reconciliation in Yukon

06/05/2015

Would you like to find out more what other organizations are doing for reconciliation in Yukon? Or, are you an organization that has an event orlearning opportunity you would like to share? Connect with us and we will add your information to our growing list!

Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission

06/03/2015

Excerpt from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's Final Report:

"Reconciliation must inspire Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples to transform Canadian society so that our children and grandchildren can live together in dignity, peace, and prosperity on these lands we now share."

Read Honouring the Truth, Reconciling for the Future Summary of the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, or the Calls to Action.

Disability Rights in Yukon

05/20/2015

A Disability Rights Workshop and Summit took place in the context of a week-long disability rights initiative in Whitehorse, Yukon called Keeping Track of Our Rights - held from December 1st - 5th, 2014. Participants from Whitehorse and eight other Yukon communities attended this historic event. It was co-hosted by the Yukon Human Rights Commission (YHRC) and the Yukon Council on Disabilities (YCOD), with a grant from the Community Development Fund.

The workshops were facilitated by York University, Disability Rights Promotion International (DRPI) professor Dr. Marcia Rioux and DRPI project coordinator, Paula Hearn, using their monitoring and evaluation instruments and tools. On Dec. 4th a Disability Rights Summit was held, which was attended by participants from the rights training workshop as well as a range of stakeholders from civil society and local government, including:

  • Stephanie Dixon, Paralympian Athlete and Summit Moderator
  • Heather MacFadgen, Director Yukon Human Rights Commission
  • Chris Blodgett, LDAY & CRPD Workshop Participant
  • Rebecca Gowan, Canadian Human Rights Commission
  • Gerard Tremblay, CRPD Workshop Participant
  • Minister Mike Nixon, Yukon Legislative Assembly
  • Ann Maje Raider, Liard First Nation
  • Rick Goodfellow, Challenge Community Vocational Alternatives

Check out this video of Chase Blodgett telling his story of living with a disability in Yukon. And, listen to a radio interview on CBC Radio with Marcia Rioux about the workshop and summit.

The one week initiative concluded with Justice Minister Mike Nixon responding to the call from disability rights advocates by promising to meet with them to discuss the need for an independent monitoring mechanism so that persons with disabilities can monitor their own rights.

His commitment came in response to the call to action issued at the Disability Rights Summit. Speaking at the summit plenary, well known Yukoner Ramesh Ferris said, "We have a monumental opportunity here in the Yukon Territory to demonstrate once again how we all can be agents of change by working together to create an independent monitoring mechanism in order to ensure that human rights for people of all abilities are not only recognized but upheld." An independent monitoring mechanism is required under the UN Convention of the Rights of Persons with Disabilities that both Canada and the Yukon have ratified.

Heather MacFadgen, former Director of Human Rights, said, "This training project has broken down barriers in the Yukon between different groups of people with various disabilities and has culminated in a common cause - a group of people across disabilities from all over the Yukon trained, ready and willing to monitor their own rights. This is exactly what the UN Convention calls for and it is what can happen now in the Yukon."

The ratification of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) by Canada in 2010 was a significant achievement for person with disabilities. It was established to "promote, protect and ensure the full and equal enjoyment of all human rights and fundamental freedoms by all person with disabilities, and to promote respect for their inherent dignity". According to this convention every province and territory in Canada, as well as the federal government, must develop and carry out policies, laws and measures to ensure that the rights listed in the CRPD are in place.

The Disability Rights Workshop and Summit exceeded our expectations in terms of skills and knowledge gained, partnerships developed, and momentum for the rights of persons with disabilities.

The Yukon Human Rights Commission (YHRC) believes that the best monitoring process will have persons with disabilities directly involved and taking the lead on monitoring the rights of persons with disabilities in Yukon.

United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

05/20/2015
A poster reading: 'United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples'

On May 14th, 2014, the Yukon Legislative Assembly voted unanimously in favour of a motion to endorse Canada's Statement of Support on the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Apart from the Northwest Territories and of course, Canada itself, the Yukon is one of the first jurisdictions in our country to stand behind such a fundamentally important document. The timing of this symbolic gesture could not have been more apt, a mere two days after James Anaya, the UN's Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples, called attention to the work that remains to be done with regards to the treatment of aboriginal people in Canada, especially in light of the alarming rates of violence against aboriginal women. In the words of the MLA who brought the motion forward, Mr. Kevin Barr, "Adopting this motion [...] must be done recognizing that it is just another step along the path toward healing and reconciliation."

Support from the Aboriginal community

The Yukon Human Rights Commission believes in the principle of "Nothing about us, without us". Accordingly, the Commission wrote all Yukon First Nations chiefs to seek their advice before calling on the Legislature to endorse the Declaration. The Commission also consulted on the proposed motion with Council of Yukon First Nations ("CYFN") Grand Chief Ruth Massie, who provided leadership, advice and support, and was present the day of the unanimous adoption. Both Mr. Barr, who is Métis, and Mr. Darius Elias, who is a Vuntut Gwitchin First Nations member, spoke at length of their support of the motion before the Legislative Assembly, as did the leaders of all three political parties amid other MLAs.

Impact of the Declaration

The Declaration itself, although initially rejected by Canada right up until 2010, was drafted with the help of Canadian First Nations over the span of twenty years. Although a declaration is not technically a legally binding document, its endorsement reflects a nearly worldwide willingness to guarantee a certain minimum of rights to indigenous peoples. It includes principles that are present in other instruments of international law that are legally binding, such as treaties, conventions and covenants like the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. It can help generate new ones, through the development of customary law - some authors argue that it already has. It is also a tool that can be used by the courts to interpret existing laws and policies "in accordance with the principles of justice, democracy, respect for human rights, equality, non-discrimination, good governance and good faith" (article 46(3)). The Human Rights Commission also uses the Declaration as an aid to interpret and apply the Human Rights Act.

Why is the Declaration so important?

The Declaration constitutes a recognition of colonization and dispossession of lands, territories and resources from Indigenous peoples. It sets in place provisions to ensure that this does not continue to happen. One such provision is the requirement of "free, prior and informed consent" of indigenous peoples when their lives or territories stand to be affected by a proposed measure. There are measures of redress set out for the instances where consent has not been obtained. Although our Canadian constitutional law enshrines the duty to consult with First Nations in good faith when their rights are to be affected, the Declaration takes this a step further. The Declaration aims not only to address the harm previously done, but it seeks to level the playing field that has been slanted in favour of the State for so long. It aims to transform the relationship between States and Indigenous peoples from one based on oppression and racism to one that is based on mutual respect, equality and fairness.

New Commission Member

05/06/2015

On April 30th, the Yukon Legislature appointed Mr. Russell Knutson as the newest member of the Commission. Members are appointed for 3 year terms on a staggered basis.

2013-2014 Annual Report

04/07/2015

Download the Yukon Human Rights Commission 2013-2014 Annual Report in PDF form here:

YHRC Annual Report 2013 - 2014

Decisions of the Board of Adjudication and Courts

02/25/2015

As part of the human rights complaint process, the Commission may ask for a decision from the Human Rights Board of Adjudication, which is independent of the Yukon Human Rights Commission.

If a complaint cannot be settled, or in special cases where the Commission chooses not to investigate and refers the complaint directly to the Board, there will be a hearing into the complaint before a Board of Adjudication. A panel of Adjudicators who are appointed by the Legislature and independent of the

Commission will conduct a public hearing into the complaint. If the Board decides discrimination has happened, it can make orders to stop the discrimination, to pay damages for financial loss caused by the discrimination and to pay compensation for "injury to dignity, feelings or self-respect".

A decision of the Board of Adjudication can be appealed on questions of law to the Supreme Court of the Yukon. Decisions of the Board and Courts are public.

For further information on the Board of Adjudication contact Secretariat.

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under the breezeway.

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215 - 305 Main Street
Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2B4